TO THE WIDOW OF MISSING JOURNALIST TIM M. OLIVAREZ: READ THIS

JGL Eye

By JOSEPH G. LARIOSA

(© 2014 Journal GlocaLinks)

CHICAGO (JGL) – It was an unseasonably warm morning of February 4, 1985 when Tim M. Olivarez, correspondent of Tempo, a sister publication ofManila Bulletin, accompanied me in covering a murder case in Bulacan.

On our way back to the Bulletin, Tim told me that he was going to see a smuggling lord, Jose “Don Pepe” Oyson, that night. I asked him if I could join him.

Tim agreed provided I met him at about 7 that night inside our common beat – the Makati Police headquarters. For some reason, I forgot all about our rendezvous that night.

Two days later, Tim’s distraught wife, Cecille, called me up, asking for Tim’s whereabouts.
I told Cecille, “I had no idea.”

A Bikolano, like myself, Tim was also editing a community newspaper in Bataan province. Tim was never to be seen alive again since.
When I pored over the mechanics of Republic Act 10368, the law bestowing reparation and recognition on human rights victims under martial law, I just realized that Tim’s survivors could qualify as human rights claimants under the “Anti-Enforced or Involuntary Disappearance Act of 2012.”

First of all, the law covers the violations during the period from Sept. 21, 1972 to Feb. 25, 1986. Tim disappeared on Feb. 4, 1985. And

Secondly, the violations should be committed by “agents of State, including President Marcos, his spouse Imelda R. Marcos, their immediate relatives by consanguinity or affinity, their immediate and close relatives, associates, cronies and subordinates.”

On board my car, Tim was telling me that Don Pepe was upset that he described in his Tempo article days earlier the modus operandi on how Don Pepe smuggled goods from Hong Kong to his turf in Paranaque beach.
SMUGGLER USES TELECOPE TO MONITOR HIS MEN
According to Tim, Don Pepe was holed up in one of the high-rise hotel rooms across the U.S. Embassy on Roxas Boulevard in Manila. Using a telescope, Don Pepe would follow several boats, carrying smuggled goods unloaded from a ship moored in either the north or south harbor and would take the goods to Don Pepe’s Manila Bay beachfront.

At the beachfront were several guards, some of them were subordinates of then Maj. Roberto (Bobby “Bungo”) Ortega of the Philippine Constabulary Metropolitan Police Command (Metrocom) Strike Force, waiting for the smuggled cargo.  Major Ortega and his men were there to protect the delivery of the Don Pepe’s smuggled goods.

“After my story was published in Tempo, Bobby Ortega went looking for me,” Tim told me. “Bobby even called up the Tempo offices. But it was Ruther (D. Batuigas, chief of reporters of Tempo), who answered the phone. Ruther told me Bobby sounded upset about me writing the smuggling story.”

As crime reporter for Manila Bulletin, I personally came to know Bobby Ortega during my coverage. Every time, there was bank robbery in Quezon City, whenever police reporters, including myself, rushed to scene, I always saw inside a bank a mestizo (light skinned) guy, who was oftentimes wearing civilian clothes, beating the Quezon City police first responders to the bank robbery scenes. I had a suspicion Bobby was part of the bank robbers.

I found out later that the “mestizo” guy was Bobby Ortega.

I also later learned that Bobby Ortega was the son of Carmen Ortega, said to be a “mistress” of President Marcos.

That is why when charges were filed against Don Pepe Oyson and others for murder for the disappearance of Tim, I never volunteered the name of Bobby Ortega as Don Pepe’s conspirator in the Tim’s murder because I was scared of “Bungo” (skull in Filipino language). Neither could I write it inManila Bulletin because all the newspapers under martial law were controlled by the Marcoses. Oyson was later convicted of murder and was later reportedly  “salvaged” (extra-judicially executed) by men under Gen. Alfredo Lim when Lim became director of the National Bureau of Investigation.

As I desperately tried to have an audience with President Marcos, I asked a friend, the late Deputy Metro Manila Governor Mel Mathay, to have me and other officers of The Rizal Metro Tri Media, Inc. (Tri-Media) be inducted by the President in Malacanang. I wanted to whisper to President Marcos that his “nephew,” Bobby Ortega, was the mastermind in the disappearance of Tim. But I wimped out at the last minute.

I only told the President to provide my group reward money of P100,000 (US$25,000 at P20 to US$1 exchange rate in 1985) for information that could lead to the suspects behind Tim’s disappearance.  President Marcos told then Director Greg Cendana of the National Media Production Center to source the P100,000 from the Marcos Foundation. Even after running a Malacanang press release that President Marcos ordered a grant of P100,000 reward money to our group, Director Cendana never handed me the P100,000  reward money.

FORTUNATELY, THERE WAS NO CLAIMANT
Fortunately, nobody came forward with credible information that will compel us to release the reward money.

The only benefit that my Tri-Media was able to give to the wife of Tim was the P25,000 (US$1,250) insurance coverage that my group was able to buy with premiums provided us by some of our friends, among them then San Juan Mayor and later President Joseph E. Estrada, now Manila mayor.

When I left Manila to join my parents and siblings in Chicago, I later learned that the officers of Tri-Media discontinued the insurance coverage of its members and decided to divide among themselves about P100,000 (US$25,000) that I left in the bank so they can continue paying premiums for their insurance coverage.

I will be losing sleep if I will not write about my personal knowledge of Bobby Ortega’s link to the disappearance of Tim now that the deadline for filing of human rights claim is coming up on Nov. 14, 2014.

Another newsman reportedly told Bobby Ortega that he is one of the suspects in Tim’s disappearance but Bobby reportedly denied it.

But I want to hear it myself from Bobby Ortega. I tried to reach out to Bobby Ortega in Baguio City, where he reportedly later became a city official, to ask him why Tim mentioned his name before Tim disappeared. But I did not get any response. Hopefully, Bobby Ortega will get in touch with me if he reads this column.

And if Cecille Olivarez can read this column, too, she or Tim’s heirs can clip this column and use this as a supporting document that will testify that Bobby Ortega, the “nephew” of President Marcos, has blood in his hands in the disappearance of Tim Olivarez. If not, Cecille or Tim’s relatives can send me a sworn statement that I will sign before the Philippine Consulate in Chicago to testify that Tim Olivarez was a victim of human rights violations by the “agents of State, including President Marcos, his spouse Imelda R. Marcos, their immediate relatives by consanguinity or affinity, their immediate and close relatives, associates, cronies and subordinates.”

Cecille Olivarez, you or Tim’s heirs, have on or before Nov. 10, 2014, to get in touch with me thru my email address: jglariosa@hotmail.com or thru my Facebook, Joseph G. Lariosa.

Or Cecille or Tim’s heirs can file your claim before the Human Rights Violations Claims Board, chaired by Gen. Lina C. Sarmiento. The HRVCB is accepting applications thru its Secretariat at E. Virata Hall E. Jacinto St., U.P. Diliman Campus Diliman, Quezon City1101 Philippines. It can be reached thru Tel. No. 373.4847 or thru email address at E-mail: hrvictimsclaimsboard@gmail.com or access this link: http://www.hrvclaimsboard.gov.ph/

(lariosa_jos@sbcglobal.net)

TIM M OLIVAREZ1
Photo of Tim M. Olivarez (JGL File Photo)

SO NEAR YET SO SCARED1

SO NEAR YET SO SCARED:

President Marcos (fifth from right) inducts a group of journalists led by Joseph G. Lariosa (to Marcos’ right), president of The Rizal Metro Manila Tri-Media (Tri-Media) and now a Chicago, Illinois-based correspondent of Journal GlocaLinks. Lariosa asked President Marcos to help his group locate the whereabouts of missing Tempo correspondent Tim M. Olivarez. Lariosa wanted to whisper to the President that it was his “nephew,” Maj. Roberto “Bobby” Ortega, who was behind Olivarez’ disappearance but wimped out on the last minute. Olivarez went missing on Feb. 4, 1985 and is still missing to this day. Olivarez’ wife, Cecille, if she reads this, you or Tim’s heirs can still file a claim on or before Nov. 10, 2014 for reparation for her husband’s disappearance. (JGL File Photo)

FRIEND OF THE MEDIA1
NEWSMEN’S BENEFACTOR:

Filipino journalist Joseph G. Lariosa (fifth from left) celebrates after his party slate won in an election of officers of reporters group, The Rizal-Metro Manila Tri-Media, Inc. (Tri-Media), in early eighties. Raising his right hand (to his right) is then San Juan, Metro Manila Mayor and later Philippines President Joseph E. Estrada, now Manila mayor. Estrada was there to extend financial support for the survivors of missing newsman Tim M. Olivarez ofTempo, sister publication of Manila Bulletin. Olivarez’s wife, Cecille, if she reads this, you or Tim’s survivors could still file for reparation on Tim’s behalf on or before Nov. 10, 2014. (JGL File Photo)

Joseph G. Lariosa
Correspondent
Journal GlobaLinks
P. O. Box 30110
Chicago, IL 60630
Tel. 312.772.5454
Telefax 312.428.5714

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Asuncion Treasures at the Central Bank Museum and Metropolitan Museum Of Manila

Posted by junasun

The following photos of the works of Rafael Asuncion, Justiniano and Mariano El Major (or maybe of El Minor) were provided to us by Sonny Asuncion Rayos during his last visit  to Manila. Only very few of our relatives are aware of the existence of some valuable works and masterpieces of our forefathers in these museums and in private collections. We owe a lot then to relative like Sonny for his untiring hunt for our  lost treasures.

Here is Sonny:

“The Asuncion and Paterno art and historical pieces are sought after by museums in Manila. Here are some of the art works of Mariano and Rafael Asuncion from the Central Bank Museum.  The Metropolitan Museum of Manila has, in its collection, an oil painting of Justiniano Asuncion entitled “Ang Pagpanaw ng Patriyarka…. I am excited to see these important historical and art pieces and I am just as thrilled to share these pictures with Bulan Observer readers.”
 

 

 

Rafael Asuncion and his Peso designs

 

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Pedro Paterno and the Five and Ten peso note of the first Philippine Republic

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Justiniano Asuncion’s The Passing Of The Patriarch

 

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Mariano Asuncion’s Nuestra Senora De La Paz

 

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EVILS OF POLITICAL DYNASTY

 

JGL Eye

By Joseph G. Lariosa

(© 2014 Journal GlocaLinks)

 

CHICAGO (JGL) – If the Philippine corridors of power are populated by relatives by blood or affinity, it is not surprising.

The pre-colonial Philippines was ruled by royalties and nobilities, like lakans, datus and mighty warriors, when laws of the jungle were supreme.

The matter of succession was interrupted only by the arrivals of Spaniards and Americans.

Despite the ongoing wars in Libya, Syria and other countries caused by popular upheavals to change their overstaying leaders, like what EDSA I had done, the Philippine Congress still refuses to accept the grim reality that political dynasty is really the main reason majority of the Filipino people are wallowing in abject poverty.

Right after the Filipino people toppled Marcos for overstaying in Malacanang, the revolutionary government of Cory Aquino took the initiative to nip the political dynasty in the bud by approving a provision in the 1987 Constitution that bans a family from monopolizing power.

But the problem is that Section 26 of Art. II of the 1987 Philippine Constitution was merely directory, not mandatory. It says, “The State shall guarantee equal access to opportunities for public service and prohibit political dynasties as may be defined by law.”

This policy merely contradicted Section 13 of the same Art. II, that says, “The State recognizes the vital role of the youth in nation-building and shall promote and protect their physical, moral, spiritual, intellectual, and social well-being. It shall inculcate in the youth patriotism and nationalism, and encourage their involvement in public and civic affairs.”

How can the youth be encouraged in “their involvement in public and civic affairs” if only the youth of the overstaying politicians are given the chance to get elected into office?

This reminded me of this past week’s Gospel of Matthew 16:23, when Peter took Jesus aside and began to rebuke Him, saying, “God forbid it, Lord! This shall never happen to You (after Jesus told Peter and other apostles that as a Son of God, He was going to suffer death).” 23 But He (Jesus) turned and said to Peter, “Get behind Me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to Me; for you are not setting your mind on God’s interests, but man’s.”

 

FRAMERS WERE THINKING AS SATANS

The framers of the Philippine Constitution apparently while they were crafting the state policy against political dynasty were thinking as Satans or politicians, instead of thinking of the welfare of the people as God or statesmen. They should not have given Congress the option to “define” anti-political dynasty since it will be in conflict of the interest of these politicians. They should have just made it self-executory. Were them framers trying to drown frogs by tossing them in a shallow river? How myopic could they be?

 Caloocan City Rep. Edgar Erice (2nd-LP) told former Senator and former DILG Sec. Joey D. Lina over streaming DZMM 630 radio program, “Sagot Ko Yan!,” monitored live in Chicago, Illinois from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. last Saturday (Aug. 30) that his bill, HR 3587, an anti-political dynasty measure, is on life support.

Mr. Erice said although the anti-political dynasty measure has been introduced in every Congress during the last 27 years, it never saw the light of day.

When asked by Mr. Lina if anti-political dynasty “ay malapit sa sikmura ng mga tao” (close to stomach of the people) that would necessitate them to discuss the matter, Mr. Eric responded, very much so.

Mr. Erice said, “Siyam sa sampung pinakamahirap na probinsiya ay pinamumunuan ng mga politikong kinakasangkutan sa dynasty o mga ka-alyado ng dynasty. Bukod sa hindi mabilis ang pag-unlad ng bayan, lalong yumayaman ang political dynasty.” (Nine out of ten of the poorest provinces are headed by, if not involved with, dynasty or be allied with it. Instead of fast-tracking to improve the livelihood of the people, only the political dynasty is getting richer.)

Aside from provinces, cities and towns are also headed by political dynasty. It even starts from the lowly barangay, a training ground of the children of the mayors to run for higher office. And it goes all the way up to vice mayor, mayor and other elective positions occupied by the father, the mother, sister, brother, in-laws, etc. Not only does dynasty control the levers of power, it also monopolizes even the private enterprises.

“Nagkakahawaan na.” (It’s really infectious.)

 

180 OUT OF 291 CONGRESSMEN ENGAGED IN POLITICAL DYNASTY

 Although, his bill had hurdled the committee on suffrage, Erice said each of the 180 out of the 291 congressmen is engaged in political dynasty. He is not very optimistic that these 180 congressmen will ever vote in favor of his bill when it goes for a plenary vote.

Even party-list representatives are now infected by this plague. 

Mr. Erice told Mr. Lina that his bill will not allow an elected politician to let his children, siblings, parents or second degree of consanguinity and affinity, including in-laws, parents of in-laws and children of in-laws to run for office.

Right now, the Vice President (Binay) has a daughter, who is a senator, another daughter, who is a representative, a son, who is a mayor, and a wife, who was a former mayor. Or the Marcoses, who have a senator, a representative and a governor in the nuclear family.

There are at least two in the senate, who are siblings, one half-brothers, before a mother-and-son out of the 24 senators. There are governors, whose wives are either mayor or members of the city or municipal or provincial boards. In the case of Davao City (Mayor Duterte), when the father was termed out as mayor, he ran as vice mayor, then, let her daughter ran for mayor. When, he ran again for mayor, his son was his running mate as vice mayor.

In the case of Camarines Sur, in the last election, the grandfather ran against his grandson, who won as governor. Even Speaker Feliciano Belmonte, Jr., who is pushing for the passage of the anti-dynasty bill, is having credibility issues on this bill because his only daughter, Joy Belmonte, is the incumbent vice mayor of Quezon City while his nephew, Christopher “Kit” Belmonte is a representative of Quezon City’s 6th district.

Mr. Erice, however, is willing to compromise: to allow to run “two relatives in the governor’s office, successive or at the same time.Kailangan lang maumpisahan. (We just need to break the ice.) I hope there will be a sunset provision that will end such practice after a term of office.

“It’s better than nothing because peoples’ initiatives and referendum need higher threshold requirements: 3% vote of the electorate and 10% vote of the entire electorate, that is hard to meet.

Like Lina, who said he will not tolerate political dynasty, Mr. Erice said he will never let relatives of the second degree of consanguinity to run while he is in office.

He said if he succeeds with the political dynasty bill, he will turn to other electoral reforms, like electoral voting and how to deal with political butterflies. Stay tuned! (lariosa_jos@sbcglobal.net)

Joseph G. Lariosa
Correspondent
Journal GlobaLinks
P. O. Box 30110
Chicago, IL 60630
Tel. 312.772.5454
Telefax 312.428.5714

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Asuncion kin reunion

by jun asun*

To all Asuncion relatives:

There will be a reunion on August 15 at 24 Times Street as requested by Sor Marissa Asuncion to celebrate the Feast of La Asuncion de Nuestra Seniora.

There will be a 6:30 pm mass followed by dinner. It will be a potluck.

For more Info, please contact Ed Rojas or Malou Asuncion.

*Thanks Ed and Malou for the Info! I wish you all a happy get-together.- jun asun

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“Tree tunnel” in Sorsogon lost to road widening

  Yahoo South East Asia Newsroom  by Kim Arveen Patria

Trees in this portion of the highway in Bulan, Sorsogon, have grown big enough that their branches meet, as if creating a tunnel. The so-called tree tunnel is threatened by clearing operations for road widening projects. (Photo from Bulan's Facebook page)
A tree-lined portion of the highway is among the most photographed spots in Bulan, Sorsogon, but some fear the so-called “tree tunnel” will soon be seen only in photos.

Hundreds of almost century-old trees are set to be cut down to make way for wider roads in the coastal town, which is among the busiest and richest in the province.

Angry locals have questioned the government’s road widening projects. An online petition has been launched to stop the tree-cutting. Others have taken to the streets.

“Bulanenos should unite now to save the trees that have yet to be cut down by the Department of Public Works and Highways,” a Change.org petition read.

Bulan resident Ramil Agne, who posted the petition, told Yahoo Philippines that the DPWH has temporarily stopped the cutting of trees, pending a consultation.

He noted that the move came too late, however, as about 185 have already been cut from May 14 to 21. A total of 235 trees would be cut for the road work.

Officials have claimed that the roadside had to be cleared of trees to expand the highway to 20 meters from 15 meters, by adding 2.5 meters to each side.

“The traffic volume on our highway does not warrant a road widening project,” Agne said. He added that the 5-meter expansion “is not enough to call progress versus cutting trees.”

Many residents have also wondered why the road will be expanded when the local airport it leads to has been idle for decades. DPWH has not responded to requests for comment.

“I don’t want the trees to be cut down for the sake of useless road widening project. Road widening project will benefit only few people specially in terms of corruption,” said Andrew Zuniga, who signed the petition.

A “selfie campaign” has also been launched against the project, with netizens posting photos of themselves holding up appeals to save the town’s “tree tunnel.”

More than 100 trees have already been cut to make way for wider roads in Bulan, Sorsogon. (Photo by Karl CK)

Bulan’s case is the latest in what netizens have taken to calling a tree-cutting rampage by the DPWH, most of them tagged unnecessary by the areas’ locals.

Earlier this month, locals in Los Banos, Laguna, protested the cutting of trees for a widening project covering a 5.6-kilometer stretch of road near Mt. Makiling.

Local officials in Iloilo City have meanwhile asked the DPWH to explain why so-called “heritage trees” have been cut down along the city’s General Luna highway.

In Naga City, the local government is also leading efforts against a plan to cut down at least 650 trees along the Maharlika Highway in Camarines Sur province.

“Thousands of trees all over the Philippines, many of them century-old, have been cut for road widening… Many more trees face the same fate,” a separate Change.org petition said.

The petition, posted by Ivan Henares, called on the DPWH and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources to stop cutting trees and review the policy.

“This review should provide a mechanism for genuine public consultation and a detailed scientific assessment the cutting of trees may have on the environment,” Henares said.

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Atty. K. Digno M. Asuncion

by Eduardo C. Rojas 

Today at 8:36 AM
My fellow Asuncion relatives, just saw this post of cousin Elcee’s FB.  Elcee is our second cousin (my generation though Elcee and her sibling Architect K Digno are younger).  Their dad K. Digno Asuncion is the first cousin of our mom (generation of Gracia Asuncion Carrillo Rojas & Corazon Asuncion Carrillo Galang).  Atty K Digno’s dad, Kenerino (married to Leonor Manas) is the sibling of our grandmother Guia Asuncion Carrillo (same generation as Consuelo Asuncion Intengan, Adonis Asuncion, Jacobo Asuncion, Rodolfo Asuncion, ..).  Malou & brother Andres “Jun”Asuncion’s line comes from Adonis, Sor Marissa Asuncion & sis Sor Naty come from Jacobo, Grace – Ann Grey – Monina – Ronivic – Rollie came from Dr Ronnie Asuncion, whose dad Rodolfo (married to Monica Gerona) is the brother of our grandmother Guia Asuncion.

 

Elcee Asuncion Villa

14 hrs ·

Our father, Atty. K. Digno M Asuncion, passed away peacefully in Manila today, May 12th – just as his wife and 5 children were taking Leone Giulio to the crematorium in Italy. He was surrounded by his loving in-laws and grandchildren. It is bittersweet that we lost 2 people we love within a week of each other. But now we know that we have 2 angels in heaven who are toasting us right now with their fav beer. We love you Dad. You taught us so much. You loved us so much.

 

To Elcee,  Ding and Families:

We would like to express our sincere  condolences on the passing away of your father Atty. K. Digno Asuncion. Tears on earth, joy in heaven.

jun asuncion + Family and Bulan Observer

 

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SECRET OF FIL AM CENTENARIAN: CHICHARON (FRIED PORK RIND)

 

By JOSEPH G. LARIOSA

(© 2014 Journal GlobaLinks)

 

 

CHICAGO (JGL) – Even when she was already dying inside the intensive care unit (ICU), Luz Diaz Agustin-Mella was still craving for chicharon (friend pork rind).

Her daughter, Heidilynn Mella-Equina, told the Journal GlobaLinks that aside from crediting her mother as having full of “faith and (being a) spiritual woman,” her Mom’s fondness for chicharon might have helped her extend her life to live more than a hundred years.

Ms. Mella-Equina, a general practicing nurse, said part of the food servings of her Mom had been chicharon at breakfast, lunch and dinner despite her and her family members’ warning her Mom that too much chicharon could be very fattening and would merely increase her cholesterol intake.

A Baptist, Luz Diaz Agustin-Mella would quote Psalm 9:10, which says, “As for the days of our life, they contain seventy years.” She would say, she had outlived the 70-year biblical injunction’s life span, “Am I not entitled to indulge in chicharon thru the remaining days of my life?”

Ms. Agustin-Mella, a home economics teacher and native of Bulan, Sorsogon in the Philippines, succumbed last March 4 at the age of 100 years and 18 days to complication from surgery to remove a blood clot from her large intestine in the Our Lady of the Resurrection Medical Center at 5645 West Addison Street in Chicago’s near northwest after eight days of confinement.
“She had continuous vomiting but had continuously prayed for two hours and gave up her fight for her life only when she realized that all her loved ones were by her bedside. She died peacefully,” her grieving daughter said.

“My Mom died a very happy woman. She was able to eat her favorite chicharon, would be very comfortable cooling herself off with a Philippine-spun pamaypay (fan) and would drink three cups of coffee everyday,” Heidilynn said.

Except during her birth deliveries and her last surgical operation and her regular doctor’s check ups, Luz Mella had never been hospitalized. Her only medications were eye drop as she had eye cataract and glaucoma, and Ibuprofen. She did not have any “maintenance medications.”

 

BAPTIST CHURCH IN LAS PINAS STARTED IN HER GARAGE

 

She had no high blood, no diabetes. She did not complain from anything.

Her body might have deteriorated causing her to use a walker for mobility. But her mind was still very good as she prayed and sang her favorite Gospel songs, “In the Garden,” words and music by Austin Miles, and “I Surrender All” by Judson W. Van De Venter that she learned as a Baptist, a Christian denomination she joined in 1968 in the Philippines seven years before immigrating to the United States.

A growing Las Pinas, Metro Manila Baptist church started in the garage of her home in 1970 as she loved to be a missionary to spread the Gospel.

She was fond of listening to Moody Radio, a 24/7 radio broadcast that “produces and delivers compelling programming filled with solid biblical insight and creative expressions of faith that helps take to the next step in your relationship with Christ.”

When Luz turned 100 last Feb. 14 (she was born Feb. 14, 1914), she got centenarian certificates from birthday greeter host Willard Scott of NBC Today’s Show from Washington, D. C. and from the National Centenarian Awareness Project founded by Lynn Peters Adler, J.D., of Redding, Connecticut.

Heidilynn expects some institutions in the Philippines to send her mother centenary greetings when her family plans to hold a memorial service on her behalf on May 4, 2014 at the Manila Memorial Chapel in Paranaque, Metro Manila. There, Luz’ ashes urn will be buried together with her late husband, Vigor De Castro Mella, Sr., of Magallanes, Sorsogon, a civil engineer and a World War II guerilla member under the Escudero Guerilla Unit, who preceded her in death when he met an accident in 1960 while he was a provincial treasurer in Catarman, Samar, and their son, Roland Mella, Jr., an industrial engineer, who drowned in a boating accident in Cedar Lake, Indiana in 1967 at the age of 26.

Luz was cremated Monday, March 10, after funeral wake and viewing last Friday, March 7, at Cumberland Chapel at Norridge, Illinois.

An alumna of Far Eastern University, Luz graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Home Economics and worked for three years as a nutritionist starting at the outbreak of World War II in 1941 at the U.S. Public Health, an agency that offered her to immigrate to the U.S.

After the war, Luz worked at the government’s Bureau of Printing, Department of Finance, taught home economics at the Sorsogon and Goa, Camarines Sur Provincial High Schools, employed at Government Service Insurance System and last taught at Muntinlupa High School for three years after which she revived her U.S. immigration application and immigrated with her family to the U.S. in 1975.

In Chicago, she worked for about five to six years at the Bunilsor Medical Clinic in Chicago before she retired.

Her survivors are her children, Romeo (Ophelia), a nautical engineer; Dr. Lourdes “Ditas” (Jaime) Hilao; Ramon, a retired American Red Cross nurse (Mila Texon); Heidilynn (Elson) Equina; and Vigor, Jr., retired medical clinic network worker (Josephine Belleza); 24 grandchildren; and great grandchildren and numerous nephews, nieces, grand nephews and grand nieces. Two other children preceded her, Roland  (who died at the age of 6 years old) and Roland, Jr., who died in 1967. (lariosa_jos@sbcglobal.net)

 

 

Mama22

HAPPY 100TH BIRTHDAY!

Luz Diaz Agustin-Mella (seated second row, third from right) is surrounded by her grandchildren from left to right (back row) Miguel Equina, Penny Mella, Mary Foster, John Mella, Jamie Hilao, Karen Mella and Jay Hilao; second row, from left, Roy Mella, Rocky Mella and Ramil Mella; front row are Kaleya Equina and Lynn Hilao-Tubalinal at her 100th birthday celebration last Feb. 14 at Georgio’s Banquet Hall at 8800 West 159th Street in Chicago’s suburban Orland Park. Luz Mella died last March 4 and was cremated March 10. A memorial service for her will be held on May 4, 2014 at the Manila Memorial Chapel at the Manila Memorial Park in Paranaque, Metro Manila, Philippines.  (JGLPhoto courtesy of Katleya M. Equina)

 

WITH FOUR YOUNGEST GRANDCHILDREN:

Luz Diaz Agustin Mella

Luz Diaz Agustin-Mella (seated right) is surrounded by her four youngest grandchildren from left to right Ramil Mella, Ramon Mella, Katleya Equina and Miguel Equina during the celebration of her 100th birthday last Feb. 14 at Georgio’s Banquet Hall at 8800 West 159th Street in Chicago’s suburban Orland Park. Luz Mella died last March 4 and was cremated March 10. A memorial service for her will be held on May 4, 2014 at the Manila Memorial Chapel at the Manila Memorial Park in Paranaque, Metro Manila, Philippines.  (JGLPhoto courtesy of Katleya M. Equina)

Joseph G. Lariosa
Correspondent
Journal GlobaLinks
P. O. Box 30110
Chicago, IL 60630
Tel. 312.772.5454
Telefax 312.428.5714

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